getting comfortable with being ordinary

The oatmeal wheat dough is raising in the oven and I'm on my 13th cup of tea. It feels like someone just boxed my ears and if I knew who it was, I might just let loose some Scrooge on them. But, I don't and that's probably better. The upside of this whole sick thing (because there is always an upside) is that there is bread dough in the warm oven and I'm on my 13th cup of tea.

Making bread is a big commitment and probably why bread machines and bakeries and sliced situations are so popular. Who has hours to linger around a warming oven and who has patience to knead a ball of dough for 6-8 minutes? Few people.

And it might be easy to make assumptions about those few people with that kind of time on their hands - that they are smaller or less important or less interesting. Those ordinary folks with rugged hands and simple lives.

I'd like to be that kind of simple folk - just ordinary, you know.

I'm not saying I don't want to be great or that I don't want to pursue the passions buried in my gut or that I don't want to marvel and chase dreams. I'm not saying that.

I just never want to make life more complicated than it was when God sent a celestial choir to a group of simple folks hanging out in the fields. These were the kinds of folks who spent long hours doing ordinary things and these were the kinds of folks God wanted to tell about the Savior's birth. These were the folks who heard it first, in a glorious arrangement of God's best choir.

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/55715889]

Anyway, there are a lot of lights here - buildings and shops and trees lit up for the holidays. But the lights are always on and people are always working, always getting ahead and afraid of falling behind. The lights are always on and people are always looking for something other than ordinary.

I know I get sucked in just like everyone else. I want people to know me and like me and appreciate my creativity. But there is wisdom inside this slow day. And wisdom in an ordinary life, the most ordinary there is, that can point more easily to a Savior who makes all things glorious.

It was not the shepherds - their stature or accomplishments or reputation - that made that middle of the night song so superb. It was the Lord who sent the host of angels, the Lord who made the starry night display, the Lord who wrote the music and the Lord who directed the song.

Maybe if we can get comfortable with being ordinary, we'll be more prepared to hear and listen and participate in what God is orchestrating in these days.

I'm going to go pour another cup of tea and see if I need to punch down the dough.