wait, with great expectation

Waiting with anticipation sounds like a funny thing to do. Because it is hard to wait actively and hard to anticipate passively. And that's exactly the miracle of Advent.

There is nothing passive about the days leading up to Christ's birth into the world - the longing for a Messiah is almost palpable throughout the Old Testament. Even as hundreds of years passed, the people of Israel (and beyond) waited with great expectation for the Savior King to come to earth. They were waiting, but they were not resigned to indifference. They read and re-read the prophecies and the promises and then they said, "Come."

Hundreds and hundreds of years of "Come, Lord Jesus." I imagine it maintaining the same intensity, though some generations must have faltered. Still, generation after generation waited actively with the words, "Come."

The incarnation was never meant to happen to us, like witnessing an act of charity on the subway by chance. The incarnation of our Lord was planned from the very beginning, even the stars thrown into the sky were set on a trajectory to proclaim His coming. 

And we are invited to take part in His coming, to anticipate the arrival of the Savior and the fulfillment of the Lord's promise. Christ coming to earth is reason to celebrate salvation for our future, but it is also a reason to celebrate God's salvation in our present. Because He is a faithful promise keeper ... and that translates to Tuesdays. The incarnation is about Tuesday morning devotions and Tuesday afternoon meetings. The incarnation is about financial difficulties and health concerns. The incarnation is about family and brokenness.

The incarnation is about God being a faithful promise keeper when He sent Jesus as a baby into a dark world to be the light.

And the incarnation is not something we let "happen" to us. It is something we invite to transform our Tuesdays and our lives.

Come, thou long expected Jesus. Come.

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