when you need a real rescue

Platitudes wouldn't be enough. I knew the conversation was S.O.S. caliber before it started, judging by the CAPS in the text message.

"AH! I'm just so frustrated, but it'll be okay," she said, when I got her on the line.

She was giving me the litany of reasons the day had unraveled and all of them were legitimate. This friend of mine is not one to over-dramatize anything, so when she says she is, "frustrated" and that "this is so hard" out loud... it's getting desperate.

She knows.

She knows God is good and that's why she followed her frustration so quickly with, "... but it'll be okay." She knows God's character of faithfulness and that He is trustworthy. She believes it, too. But...

Sometimes we need to speak the depth of our drowning so we know to cry out for a real rescue.

We need to open our eyes underwater and see how desperate the situation in order to delight rightly in our rescue from those depths. It's not enough to say "it'll be okay," even if we know it will.

Because that flippant faith doesn't give God enough glory. He is God when we are desperate - not because our trials are little things, but because they are big. He knows all the thousands things that went wrong in our day and how desperate they have made us. He doesn't want us to brush them aside with a simple, "... but it'll be okay."

Minimizing problems with platitudes does not glorify God's magnificence.

Being honest about the depth of our drowning means being honest that we need a real rescue. A real rescue - not the kind that gives you a quote or a margarita at the end of a long day. Those will never pull you up from desperate depths.

Nope, an S.O.S. like I got last night is an opportunity for us to believe God to be faithful to reach as far down as our day has gone. And she did. She spoke out her need and called out for real rescue. She stepped into the kind of belief that makes God seem the glorious Rescuer He is. He will rescue, when we believe Him for it. 

My friend remembered Wesley Hill's words recently in a lecture at Bethlehem Baptist, "Ignoring is not the path to redeeming."

When we have sin and struggle and stress and sadness, our redemption will always come by way of an honest assessment that we are drowning and in need of a real rescue.