a new commandment: love one another

Today is Maundy Thursday, which wasn't any more than a funny word pairing until I read my holy week reflection. Mandatum means "command" or "mandate" in Latin and we celebrate Maundy Thursday because on the night before Jesus was killed he gave a "new commandment" (John 13:34).

Love one another, as Christ loved us.

What a great and impossible command he gave as his parting exhortation! Love as Christ loved? The perfect and sinless Jesus, who didn't curse his enemies or get impatient at the market or cover up a white lie for his cousin? We are to love like this Jesus, who saw pain and brokenness and stepped toward it? The Jesus who associated with the lowly and the losers and the little children?

 “A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another” (John 13:34).

The Lord has been so gracious in these past few days to pour out His grace. The deeper I dig for gospel mercies, the more I find to fill my days. And I need it - every last drop of grace, I need it.

The substance of my work is not something one prays away - it is the fruit of a world torn by sin and a people tangled in deception. The prince of darkness works 24/7 to battle the life-giving joy of the Gospel message and all the ugly will be there tomorrow morning and the next. Sin is a hungry monster - it eats disaster and spits it out. Sometimes it feels like my days are walking in sin's vomit. Believe me, it feels as disgusting as it sounds.

The Lord has been gracious, though, to give grace when I'm knee deep in sin's sticky sludge. At the day's end when I am realizing that everything will look the same in the morning and my heart wants to despair, I remember that Jesus promised abundant life and then I say, "Yes, I believe it." But, my belief doesn't transform my circumstances... it transforms my heart.

And today as I reflect on Maundy Thursday - the new commandment Jesus gave to love as He loved us - I think this is exactly the place I need to be. This great and impossible command to love happens as we believe Christ for the glorious work of the cross.

Loving one another does not mean ignoring sin or downplaying deception or denying evil - Christ certainly didn't ignore, downplay or deny. And anyone who works in social services must know it is impossible to make less of the helpless state of things. Please, don't ask me to look an addict in the face and say sin really doesn't have a hold of him. Instead, because Christ knew the depth of our sin, He also knew the cost of love towards us.

Loving one another as Christ loved us means that we are willing to walk toward the hurting. Loving one another as Christ loved us means that we see the sin and deception and evil as darkness, but we believe in the power of light to expose fruitless, dark deeds (Ephesians 5). Loving one another as Christ loved us means that we speak truth about the death grip of sin and speak truth about the offer of life.

Christ was not politically correct. He was not the greatest orator. He did not consult ratings before and after a public address. Christ concerned Himself with the Truth because He was the Truth. He held all things together and still does. But, he walked toward the hurting. He sat with the broken. He listened to the wicked. He held disobedient children in his lap.

Christ got so close to the hurting that they hurt him. His loving us cost Him his life. He got so close to the broken that they broke Him. We broke Him.

If we are really going to love one another, we have to get close enough that it will cost us our lives.