the sexual revolution, a theologeek's confessions, contemporary art, and living life

Have you ever had a string of days where putting one foot in front of the other seems harder than it should seem? I mean, have you ever been frustrated at being frustrated? I'm just wondering, I guess.

Here are some things that are taking my mind off my feet this week. I hope it pushes you to think harder or differently ... and then I really hope that your knowledge grows feet. I mean, I hope your knowledge does something because otherwise it's just about puffing up.

Do you know Al Mohler? Well, he's kind of a big deal. Anyway, he wrote an article in The Atlantic recently about Helen Gurley Brown's influence on the sexual revolution. It is an interesting piece that speaks to one of the most confused cultural categories (sexuality) of our generation.

Bryan McWhite writes in a post for the EFCA online magazine about the difference between simply knowing theology and doing theology and what it means for reaching young people today. This is exactly what I like to hear! We must be about living theology not about knowing it. He writes,

What I didn’t understand at first (and realize now that I am a recovering theologeek) is that the younger generations are intensely pragmatic. And contrary to what many in the church might assume, their pragmatism is in no way opposed to serious theological thought. Young people really do desire theological understanding. But they want theological inquiry to serve a purpose beyond simply knowing.

To this generation, studying theology merely for the sake of knowing is inextricably linked to arrogance. For them, the study of theology isn’t complete until it ends in praxis. They do not abide the last three chapters of Ephesians being severed from the first three. They want to understand how knowing culminates indoing.

This piece on contemporary art, "Absolutely-Too-Much" admits that contemporary art can be a hard thing to appreciate, but it remains something to be admired. I like how this article shifts to philosophical implications in contemporary art because, of course, they are connected.

"We all had new iphones but no one had no one to call..." Thats a line from the song, "Life's for the Living" by Passenger. Sometimes, on those days when one foot drags as we put it in front of the other, we just have to remember that "life's for the living. So live, or you're better off dead." Sometimes, it's as simple as that.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VuIGX_ZGgbM]

let LOVE fly like cRaZy