St. Francis, evangelism, reliable research, sexual identity, and the 99% I'll support

I was gone last week in Michigan, but I tried to stay up on my reading. I slipped away a few times to work and inevitably ended up perusing Twitter and the blogosphere to find out what's going on in the world. I think of my twitter account like one of those tickers that talk about the Dow Jones or Wall Street (I guess all that information flying across the screen is about the economy or something). Twitter is more my cup 'o tea because it's an aggregator of information of news in theology, arts, crafts, foods, and popular headlines. I don't find everything there, but between twitter and blog posts sent to my email, I read a lot of content from a computer screen. Here are some of the things I've found.

  • How well do you know the saints? You know, the ones that get their soundbites memorialized on those inspirational posters with landscape scenery. How well do you know about their lives, their ministries, and their beliefs? Do you know them well enough to recognize when they are being misrepresented? St. Francis of Assisi is famous for saying, "Preach the gospel at all times. Use words if necessary." There is one huge problem with this inspiration - it didn't happen. Check out this great article, "FactChecker: Misquoting Francis of Assisi" by Glenn T. Stanton to find out more.
  • This short article, "No Such Thing as the Gift of Evangelism" by Ed Stetzer exposes the excuses far too many believers use to 'get out of' sharing the gospel with others. I'm interested to know your thoughts - especially if you've taken a Spiritual Gifts Inventory that said you are not gifted in evangelism. Stetzer shares four proposals that I think are very helpful.
  • Have you ever wondered where the statistics come from that say a child in the foster care system requires 40 square feet to live in the state of Iowa (true story, I checked)? Where does research come from and why do we trust it? Who is checking and double checking the methods of the researchers and how many re-writes of the results happen before the public sees it? Here's the biggest question: when we don't agree with what research finds, is it bad research or just disagreeable results? A professor at UT conducted research of children of gay parents and came up with some very UNpopular results. A blogger wrote a letter and now the University of Texas is looking into his "questionable" ethics in the study. Check out this article from Denny Burk, "The Witch-Hunt for Mark Regnerus" and see if you can make sense of it.
  • This article, "The New Sexual Identity Crisis" from Jeff Buchanan (Executive Vice President of Exodus International) writes about the identity fragmentation that we see in regards to sexuality. Too many people have chalked it up to progress or trend or fad and not enough of us have taken a deep look at what it means for society and culture that we are a people so sexually confused. This article gives great insight.
  • In this video, Jonah Lehrer shares that "grit is the stubborn refusal to quit." I love that. I can support 99% when it stands for good, old-fashioned perspiration. If you've got the time, his insights on creativity and how we get there are really refreshing. [vimeo http://vimeo.com/45162748]
  • I am a huge fan of the arts. HUGE. My mom is a music teacher, my dad's family of 10 grew up performing, and I grew up on the stage with my siblings in church and school productions. This story in the Huffington Post, "Grace, Love, Courage: on Art, Artists, and Patronage" talks about one particular person and her support of the arts.

As always, I could give you more, but these should keep you pretty busy. Enjoy, folks, and don't forget: knowledge is useless if it doesn't result in acts of love. Even knowledge of what's going on in the world should point us back to ways that we can serve and share the hope of the gospel.

Now concerning food offered to idols: we know that “all of us possess knowledge.” This “knowledge” puffs up, but love builds up. If anyone imagines that he knows something, he does not yet know as he ought to know. But if anyone loves God, he is known by God.

(1 Corinthians 8:1-3 ESV)