with a wink and a smile

I'm not sure why, but this song was playing in my head as I sat down to write today. I just lunched on my version of a Honduran staple - baleadas (substitute wheat tortilla, take out salty cheese, add salsa) - and now I sit helplessly waiting to hear back from students who are probably sleeping and completely unaware that my afternoon plans somewhat hinge on their replies. In the meanwhile, I want to bring you up-to-date on some of the happenings here. In my typical, completely disconnected fashion, I'm giving it to you straight today about baking, meanings of words, and a strange desire to start a movement.

LovE CakE!

I'm still marinating on this idea of baking and sweetness and life and tasting ... yesterday was the last day of chapel and I spent the morning hours (prior to 6:30 departure) baking up some serious pumpkin gobs with butter/cream cheese frosting. A week of creative treats for the seniors who bring their Bibles to chapel almost wore me right out, but there is a beautiful, redeeming quality to what some women painfully label a chore.

This redeeming quality to laboring in the kitchen is not the look on people's faces when they eat your hard-won creation (though I've found I often make them eat it in front of me so I can see a reaction) nor is it the exclamations of delight and the serious battle for second helpings. The redeeming quality is an empty tupperware at the end of the day.

I (quite haphazardly) stumble onto the school bus in the morning in professional garb, toting a backpack and the familiar tupperware container with secret treats. By the time I get to school, I usually have frosting or chocolate or some unknown ingredient stuck to some inconvenient place. But, back to redeeming qualities...

The tupperware goes out from the house full and comes back empty. Every single one of the little, labored-over creations has found its place and that knowledge only finds me right back in the kitchen to make it happen again. What joy! Check out this video that my friend Kasey Miller (who, by the way, is one of my favorite inspirations in the kitchen!!) shared... this will make you want to LOVE CAKE too!

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c38W5YQ5PdQ]

gracia and gracias

So, my word study on "pan" and "paneh" might have failed, but I'm very interested in the connection between the Spanish words, "Gracias" (thank you) and "gracia" (grace) and I think this will lead to something more conclusive. Both words are derived from the Latin root "gratus," which means "beloved," "agreeable," "favorable," and "pleasing."

I was originally interested because at the Micah Project sometimes we just spend time in prayer thanking God for His character. Many times, this will come up, "Señor, gracias por tu gracia!" Maybe no one else takes notice or thinks it odd, but whenever I hear that, I wonder about the strange and beautiful connection between gratitude and grace. When we say thank you, we are responding to an action or a gift or something we have received. Gratitude is what happens (or should happen) after receiving something good. We feel strange accepting a gift or complement without giving something back, so we express our gratitude by saying, "Thank you."

Here is where I get really interested... why do we use almost the exact same word to describe unmerited favor? The Miriam-Webster dictionary (and many Christians) gives the first definition for grace to mean what is received from God and that which allows one to have faith in what Christ did on the cross.

So - back to that Latin. If the Latin says, "pleasing, beloved, agreeable," and "favorable," why am I stuck on these two words? Well, if we say "thank you" because we have received something, that person or persons have become (in some way) beloved or agreeable to us. What is AMAZING is that we have done absolutely nothing to please or become favorable in God's sight. Even our righteous acts are like filthy rags (Isaiah 64:6), but God called us "beloved" and showed us "favor," though we came with nothing to deserve this response.

WOW!

starting a movement

Everybody is making movements these days, so I thought I would throw in my two cents about what deserves "movement" status. Maybe it's because I'm sitting here waiting for a student to tell me if she does/doesn't want to meet for coffee (though she told me for sure yesterday) or maybe it's because I've been around young people long enough to know commitments are ... fluid at best and often motivated by bad information.

So, I'd like to start a movement. The movement will be called, "we care and follow through with things that matter." I know - it's not very catchy right now, but I think I could hire some serious PR and those flaky kids would really start jumping on board. Well... they would jump on board if the message was so diluted no one knew exactly what kind of movement they were joining. But, they would join for sure, eventually. And, by that time the whole purpose of said movement would be moot (case in point).

That's my point.

It is very easy to get kids fired up about things (there are many, many broken things to bemoan in this world) and very hard to get kids fired up about searching serious answers followed up by serious action. I'm not talking extreme, here, folks. I actually think things get extreme when we get distracted by flashy PR campaigns and people telling us what is important and what to do about it.

I guess it would be refreshing to see a youth movement with, as my high school history teacher used to say, "fire in its belly." Everything from coffee dates to mission trips to environmental debates would be informed by something solid - something true and absolute and transformational. Let me know if you know of one and I'll scrap the whole idea.